Meet the winners of H&M Foundation's 3rd edition of the Global Change Awards


Meet the winners of H&M Foundation’s 3rd edition of the Global Change Awards

Fashion heroes

By Ami Unnikrishnan  April 3rd, 2018

It might be spring but it’s -11 degrees in Stockholm, yet the show must go on and so it did, at the historic Stockholm City Hall — the venue of the Nobel Prize banquet — where leading thinkers and fashion personalities mingled with some of the hottest new names in fashion — the winners of the Global Change Awards — whose innovations could change the face of fashion as we know it. 

Stockholm City Hall
Stockholm City Hall

The Global Change Award, an initiative by the H&M foundation, in collaboration with Accenture and the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, is the largest award of its kind. The main mission? To be a catalyst for change. As the fashion industry grows, the need for new solutions is greater than ever. The impact on our environment heightens the more we fill our shopping bags. H&M and its partners firmly believe there has to be a shift to turn fashion from a linear industry to a circular one. In a nutshell: making it more sustainable from a grassroots level.

This year, there were over 2,600 applicants from around the world, but only five winners. Their innovative idea will leave you transfixed and give you a whole new take on the future of textiles and fashion. 

Meet the 5 innovators from the 3rd Global Change Awards:

Algae Apparel/Algalife

This father-daughter duo from Israel has tackled the issue of water pollution by creating an innovation that uses algae. The result is a bio-fibre and environmentally friendly dye. But wait, it gets better, the fabric created releases anti-oxidants, vitamins and other nutrients that can be absorbed by the skin whilst wearing the material. Who doesn’t want a piece of that? alga-life.com

Fungi Fashion/MycoTEX: Awarded €150,000

A project from the Netherlands, this young lady has found a way to combine Mycelium-mushroom roots with 3D technology, resulting in new a natural fibre. This material brings a whole new meaning to recycling garments for when you're done with it, simply bury it in the ground to decompose. neffa.nl

Smart Stitch/Resortecs

Hardware on clothing is what often makes garment recycling complicated and expensive but this pair from Belgium have found a solution. They’ve innovated a thread that dissolves at a high temperature, making the process simpler.  Even cooler? Garments used with this innovation can be disassembled and reassembled to whatever style you want. resortecs.com

The Regenerator/Swerea

Recycling fabric is not the easiest task. So this Swedish group worked on a circular technology that uses an earth-friendly chemical to not just separate but regenerate cotton and polyester blends into a new textile. Who knows? With this grant, it may become a part of your closet soon. swerea.se

Agralopp

US-based Crop-A-Porter’s innovation allows for harvest remains from various crops to be turned into useful bio-fibre through a low-cost, closed-loop technology and just like that a trendy modern albeit sustainable material is born. circular-systems.com

Yitzac Goldstein, Geof Kime and Isaac Nichelson of Agralopp


Zengwei Guo, Lisa Schwarz Bour, Erik Nilsson, Tobias Köhnke and Bengt Hagström of The Regenerator


Renana Krebs and Dr. Oded Krebs of Algae Apparel


Cédric Vanhoeck and Vanessa Counaert of Smart Stitch


Aniela Hoitink of Fungi Fashion

A project from the Netherlands, this young lady has found a way to combine Mycelium-mushroom roots with 3D technology, resulting in new a natural fibre. This material brings a whole new meaning to recycling garments for when you're done with it, simply bury it in the ground to decompose. neffa.nl

With H&M leading this change, you can rest assured that sustainable fashion will on point, not a drab, beige potato sack. Their ever-evolving Conscious Collection has been spotted on everyone from Princess Victoria of Sweden to Miranda Kerr. Need we say more? Time for a little ‘conscious’ in every closet.