Tried and tested: three tricks that helped my hair grow longer


Tried and tested: three tricks that helped my hair grow longer

Rapunzel hair, here we come

By Drishti Kapadia  May 14th, 2020

If you’re looking for a sign to not cut your bangs, this is it. Social distancing has left us with a lot of free time, and if you haven’t given in to DIY haircut with kitchen scissors, then you’re already on the right track to letting your hair grow out. I’ve had long hair for most of my life, thanks to my mum and grandmother’s TLC and secret hair oil blend. Until 2018, when I cut off 16 inches of my hair to donate it to Hair for Happiness, in favour of a lob.

“Mom’s going to kill you,” were my sister’s exact words when she saw my hair, and even though my mother didn’t kill me, she did amp up my weekly oiling sessions in an attempt to restore my hair to its original length ASAP. Fast forward to 2020, my hair is back to its former length and here’s a rundown of what helped it grow long…

Twist up

The downside of having fine hair is that you can spend hours brushing it, but it’ll take seconds for it to tangle up again. Hair breakage is the biggest roadblock when you’re trying to grow out your hair. I realised the best way to deal with knots was to section my hair in to four parts. Twist each part, and start brushing it from the ends. Slowly unravelling it as you move towards the roots.

 

 

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Natural shampoo

Making your own shampoo needs some patience, but it pays off by giving your scalp a deep cleanse scalp, and allowing you to increase the gap between washes. Boil a cup of deseeded ritha or soapnuts in a litre of water till it’s reduced to half the quantity. Allow it to cool, then grind it in the mixer and strain. Use it as a regular shampoo and follow up with a hair serum. Soapnuts are antimicrobial and are known to tame frizzy hair.

 

Nix hair fall

If you’re concerned about hair fall, onion juice is about to become your BFF. It’s rich in sulphur that nourishes follicles and antioxidants that protect hair from free radical damage. Chop an onion into four pieces and grind it in a mixer. Use a muslin cloth to extract the juice from the pulp and apply it to your scalp for forty minutes, twice a week. Then shampoo and condition your hair as you normally would. If the smell bothers you, throw on a shower cap after applying it or add 2-3 drops of your favourite essential oil to the juice.

 

Photographs: Instagram