4 Sustainable Homegrown Swimwear Labels We Are Currently Loving Advertisement
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4 Sustainable Homegrown Swimwear Labels We Are Currently Loving

For all your future adventures that include beaches and bellinis

By Ruman Baig  January 21st, 2021

Despite its close association with the ocean, swimwear labels have been far from eco-friendly. The ocean’s pollution has been increasing at an alarming rate, 5.25 trillion macro and micro pieces of plastic to be precise, which has forced human beings to change the course of their action. If you’re a waterbody lover and enjoy splurging on resort-wear labels, do your research about the material it is created with. Most swimsuits are made of fabrics like nylon, lycra and spandex because of its stretch and quick-drying ability, but these materials are harmful to the ocean because of its high plastic content.

Fashion is finally being held accountable, and brands are slowly moving towards creating clothing in tandem with nature. Homegrown swimwear labels are now doing their bit by offering sustainable swimsuit/bikini options that are equally stylish, functional, yet eco-conscious. Here are some of the brands you need to add to your radar if you’re looking to buy ethical swimwear.

PA.NI Swimwear

 

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Tailor-made for Indian women, PA.NI Swimwear is created from recycled fishing nets, and other plastic waste found in the ocean. Apart from being mindful of the planet, the label feature accessories handmade by artisans to promote the local cottage industry.

What We Love:  This brand is size-inclusive and celebrates all types of bodies by creating flattering swimwear for women of every shape. They also play an active part in the ocean clean up by amplifying small organisations that work toward the cause, simultaneously urging their consumers to do the same.

Eshalal Swimwear

 

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Founded by illustrator Esha Lal, botanical printed swimsuits inspired by flora and fauna are the brand’s USP. The fabric utilised for the making comes from a sustainable Italian fabric company called Carvico. Even though the brand offers better quality material that is comfortable and sustainable, Lal has kept the price point affordable. 

What We Love:  The prints on these swimsuits are hand-painted watercolour illustrations by Esha Lal herself, making each of these pieces one-of-a-kind. Made from 100 per cent organic cotton certified by Global Organic Textile Standard,  the swimsuits are created using recycled fabric that supports its ‘Healthy Seas, a Journey from Waste to Wear’ initiative.

Verandah 

 

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Indian designer Anjali Patel Mehta, the founder of the label Verandah, launched verandah Swims two years ago. She found a gap in the Indian swimwear market for good sustainable swimsuits and decided to create a line of eco-friendly resort wear, mostly made out of econyl, a fabric created out of repurposed nylon that would otherwise add up to the overwhelming amount of ocean waste.

What We Love: Verandah was one of the first labels to offer sustainable resort-wear.  The brand regenerates swimwear out of repurposed material from the landfill, constructed in a sustainably-run factory. The brand collaborates with non-governmental, animal reserves like Tiger  Watch and Sher Bagh by drawing inspiration for their collections from these organisations. By giving these wildlife reserves a platform, they are also creating awareness about their work, while amplifying their tourism.

 

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The Summer house is a proud slow fashion brand, where the material is consciously sourced without harming the environment. They recently launched a line of sustainable and reversible swimwear, made out of econyl, which is repurposed from the fishing gear fished out of the sea.

What We Love: Fishing gear is a floating death trap; it kills around 100,000 animals every year. It takes centuries to degrade, making the killing power long-lasting.  By excavating the thrash and converting it into a usable fabric, the brand is serving the ocean and also giving its customers stylish swimwear.